News & New Release

News

Listed here are our most recent news releases. For more information on CMMT, please visit the about us section of the site.
January 20th, 2017

Leading Edge Endowment Fund (LEEF) - Sunny Hill BC Leadership Chair in Child Development

BC Children’s Hospital and the Human Early Learning Partnership (HELP) are pleased to announce that Dr. Michael S. Kobor has been appointed as the Sunny Hill BC Leadership Chair in Child Development. Dr. Kobor is a world-leading expert in the field of social epigenetics, researching how diverse early life experiences affect human development and influence children’s health, learning and behavior.

October 7th, 2016
Vancouver, B.C. [October 6, 2016] Dr. Michael Hayden, Killam Professor of Medical Genetics at the University of British Columbia and Canada Research Chair in Human Genetics and Molecular Medicine, will be inducted into the Canadian Medical Hall of Fame. He joins five other outstanding doctors whose outstanding contributions to health have made Canada, and the world, a better place. For more information, please visit http://cdnmedhall.org/induction-ceremony
June 22nd, 2016

June 22, 2016 - More people may have the potential to develop Huntington’s disease than previously thought, according to a study published in the June 22, 2016, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. But the increase comes in the percentage of people who have a lower risk of developing the hereditary disease, which causes uncontrolled movements, loss of intellectual abilities, emotional problems and eventually death.

May 26th, 2016

WEDNESDAY, May 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- There's new hope for children stricken by mysterious developmental delays, with a new study showing that extensive genetic analysis may help determine the cause of their disability.

Canadian researchers found a precise genetic cause for seven out of every 10 children suffering from a previously undiagnosed condition that caused developmental delays.

May 26th, 2016

WEDNESDAY, May 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- There's new hope for children stricken by mysterious developmental delays, with a new study showing that extensive genetic analysis may help determine the cause of their disability.

Canadian researchers found a precise genetic cause for seven out of every 10 children suffering from a previously undiagnosed condition that caused developmental delays.

October 21st, 2015

A handful of British Columbians are helping test a new “gene silencing” drug designed to halt production of a toxic protein that causes brain wasting in Huntington Disease.

A clinical trial now underway to prove the safety of the experimental drug ISIS-HTT will include 36 patients with very early symptoms of the disease.

“This is a brand new technology that is just now being applied to humans,” said Blair Leavitt, director of the Centre for Huntington Disease (CHD) at the University of British Columbia.

August 7th, 2015

Huntington’s disease (HD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by a genetic mutation that leads to the generation of a toxic form of a protein called huntingtin. Recent technical advances have enabled Drs. Amber Southwell, Michael Hayden, and Blair Leavitt of the UBC Centre for Molecular Medicine and Therapeutics and the Centre for Huntington Disease and their colleagues to develop an ultrasensitive method of measuring mutant huntingtin protein in the cerebrospinal fluid of HD patients1.

April 9th, 2015

A new test has been developed by an international team of investigators that for the first time can measure the build-up of a harmful mutant protein in the nervous system of patients affected by Huntington’s disease (HD). Published April 6th in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, the research team behind the findings hope that the new assay will enable the testing of new drugs designed to decrease levels of the pathogenic mutant huntingtin protein that causes the disease. This test could also be useful in predicting or monitoring the progression of HD.

August 10th, 2014
Dr. Michael Kobor's cutting edge Social Epigenetics research is profiled in the summer issue of CIHR's Population and Public Health News: http://www.cihr-irsc.gc.ca/e/48477.html
June 11th, 2014

Congratulations to Dr. Elizabeth Conibear on receiving the 2014 Killam Teaching Prize from UBC.

These university-wide awards are given out annually in recognition of teaching excellence. Award recipients are nominated by students, colleagues and alumni, for their ability to motivate and stimulate critical thinking, and their innovative approaches to teaching methodology and curricula.